Updated Oct 13, 2020

PROSPER - Promoting skills and productivity enhancement for resilience

Part of London School of Economics

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BRAC'S PROSPER participants receive classroom and hands-on training where they are matched to an employer in a high-demand trade.

PROSPER participants receive classroom and hands-on training where they are matched to an employer in a high-demand trade. During the trial, BRAC is offering PROSPER at different prices, including with a deferred payment option in some cases, to young workers across 30 locations. The RCT will generate evidence on how credit constraints affect demand for skills training (including differences fo...
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PROSPER participants receive classroom and hands-on training where they are matched to an employer in a high-demand trade. During the trial, BRAC is offering PROSPER at different prices, including with a deferred payment option in some cases, to young workers across 30 locations. The RCT will generate evidence on how credit constraints affect demand for skills training (including differences for young wives and mothers); how skills training affects employment, earnings, and aspirations; the cost-effectiveness of workforce development programs; and how the spillover effects of training workers affect current businesses and workers. The RCT results will help BRAC make PROSPER more effective as they scale it up beyond the RCT to eventually reach 500,000 youth. The findings will be published and widely disseminated to help USAID and other organizations to improve workforce skills development programs that reduce youth unemployment in low-income settings.
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Stage 2: Research & Development

With an Evidence Generation grant from USAID’s Development Innovation Ventures, the London School of Economics (LSE) is running a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of PROSPER, a skill development program operated by the NGO BRAC.

Focus Areas:

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and Youth

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and YouthSEE LESS

Implemented In:

Bangladesh

BangladeshSEE LESS

1
Country Implemented In
Verified Funding
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Problem

As 2.5 billion youth enter the global labor force in the next 20 years, many will struggle to obtain jobs. In South Asia, 70 percent of workers are in short-term or informal jobs. Donors and governments spend billions of dollars on skills training programs, but evidence on the effectiveness of such training is limited. In Bangladesh, 10 million youth are currently unemployed or underemployed, often because they lack job skills required by businesses.

Milestone

Jul 2020
Funds RaisedVERIFIED
$985,896
TITLELondon School of Economics RCT "Jobs to End Poverty: Evidence from Bangladesh"
TYPEGrant
FOCUS AREAS
Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)
Implemented InBangladesh
Jan 2020
New Country Implemented In
Bangladesh