Updated Oct 06, 2020

Seasonal hunger in Zambia: Better smoothing through better planning?

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With support from Development Innovation Ventures, Drs. Supreet Kaur (UC Berkeley) and Kelsey Jack (UC Santa Barbara), affiliates at the Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA) are conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of up to 1,200 farming households to test the effectiveness of a low-cost behavioral approach to help subsistence farmers budget how they will use their maize stores t...
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With support from Development Innovation Ventures, Drs. Supreet Kaur (UC Berkeley) and Kelsey Jack (UC Santa Barbara), affiliates at the Center for Effective Global Action (CEGA) are conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of up to 1,200 farming households to test the effectiveness of a low-cost behavioral approach to help subsistence farmers budget how they will use their maize stores to last until the next harvest. A prior pilot of this program found that farmers receiving this training increased their savings by 15 percent, which shows the potential of the training. With this grant from DIV, CEGA and its partner, Innovations for Poverty Action (IPA) Zambia will provide training and exercises that guide families to allocate their maize into expenditure categories––such as school fees, farm inputs, and emergencies––and physical labels to apply to bags of maize as a visual cue to remind them of their plan. CEGA expects that families receiving the training will smooth out their maize consumption over the year so their supplies last longer, which can improve child nutrition and encourage greater farm productivity. If results are positive, this cost-effective, adaptable intervention has the potential to be scaled for hundreds of thousands of farmers across Zambia and in other countries.
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Stage 2: Research & Development

Focus Areas:

Nutrition and Aquaculture

Nutrition and AquacultureSEE LESS

Implemented In:

Zambia

ZambiaSEE LESS

1
Country Implemented In
Verified Funding
?

Problem

Zambian farmers typically have abundant food after harvest, but they often struggle to make it last the entire year. Research shows that 80 percent of households run out of maize––a staple crop that families use both for food and as an alternative to cash––during the “hungry season,” the three months when food is scarce and calorie consumption drops.

Milestone

Sep 2020
Funds RaisedVERIFIED
$426,175
TITLESeasonal hunger in Zambia: Better smoothing through better planning?
TYPEGrant
FOCUS AREAS
Aquaculture
Implemented InZambia
Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Zambia